Outreach

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Save A Life

A wood frog risks his life on a busy road during Spring amphibian migration.

What is Amphibian Migration?

On warm, wet nights in March and April, millions of frogs and salamanders leave their woodland homes to meet up at amphibian night clubs, which are local ponds, where they will dance and sing the night away! Some amphibians can lay hundreds or even thousands of eggs, turning temporary wetland ponds into ground zero for tadpole explosions, teeming with new life that will transform the surrounding forest.

Sadly, the story does not end well for many of the critters. Many frogs and salamanders die on the journey, before they can lay their eggs. In many cases, the homes where they live are across busy roads from the ponds where they breed. As traffic grows busier each year, and more land is developed, the road mortality of migrating frogs and salamanders increases. The saddest part is finding flattened females, full of eggs, just a few hops away from their destination pond.

Why does it matter?

The seasonal ponds where tadpoles are hatched, called vernal pools, are the epicenter of life in the woods. Millions of baby frogs and tadpoles feed on decaying leaves in the ponds. The energy from the old leaves is then recycled into growing frogs and salamanders, which return to the woods in the weeks ahead. Think of young frogs and salamanders like millions of little energy couriers, taking nutrients from the ponds back into the forest. Eventually they grow up to become meals for millions of other birds, mammals, and reptiles, as the foundation of a healthy ecosystem. And it all starts with Spring amphibian migration

How can you make a difference?

Amphibian migration occurs on warm, wet nights in March and April. You can make a difference by watching out for frogs and salamanders crossing the roads on rainy nights in the Spring. If you are in an area where you can hear frogs calling, they may be crossing the road close by. If they don’t end up under your tires, they have a better chance of making it to the pond, so please slow down and look out for them! To raise awareness, we are asking people to SHARE THIS POST on Facebook, showing a wood frog migrating across a busy road, asking people to “SLOW DOWN and SAVE A LIFE” on “RAINY SPRING NIGHTS”.

How can you WIN PRIZES?

What’s better than saving lives? How about saving lives AND winning awesome prizes! We are giving away really cool prizes to people who share our amphibian migration post on Facebook! Just click on the post, and share it, and you’re entered to win. (Make sure your post is set to “public” or we won’t be able to see it.)

Prize list and WINNERS:

5th Prize (ten winners):

“Give Reptiles a Chance” iguana sticker

4th Prize (ten winners):

“Give Reptiles a Chance” iguana sticker, and salamander field guide

3rd Prize (ten winners):

“Give Reptiles a Chance” iguana sticker, salamander field guide, and collectible reptile or amphibian patch

2nd Prize (five winners):

“Give Reptiles a Chance” iguana sticker, salamander field guide, collectible reptile or amphibian patch, and Forgotten Friend t-shirt

1st Prize (one winner):

“Give Reptiles a Chance” iguana sticker, salamander field guide, collectible reptile or amphibian patch, Forgotten Friend t-shirt, 4 tickets for a guided tour of the Wildlife Center at Refreshing Mountain Retreat and Adventure Center, and a $100 gift card to That Pet Place.

Grand Prize (one winner):

“Give Reptiles a Chance” iguana sticker, salamander field guide, collectible reptile or amphibian patch, Forgotten Friend t-shirt, 2 gift certificates for the Oregon Dairy Restaurant buffet, 4 tickets to ZooAmerica in Hershey, 4 tickets for a guided tour of the Wildlife Center at Refreshing Mountain Retreat and Adventure Center, and a $100 gift card to That Pet Place.

ATTENTION WINNERS: To claim your prizes, send your mailing address and shirt size (if applicable) to info@forgottenfriend.org by April 30, 2019.

Thanks for giving amphibians a chance!

Here are a few of the critters whose lives you are saving. 

American Toad
Wood Frogs in amplexus, which is a courtship behavior
Wood Frog eggs
Spring Peeper
Spotted Salamander

Here is our appearance on Good Day PA to raise Amphibian Awareness:

Special THANKS to our Amphibian Awareness Sponsors!!!

If you’d like to help sponsor this amphibian awareness effort, please email info@forgottenfriend.org.